Capital in the Twenty-First Century

(10 customer reviews)

The main driver of inequality—returns on capital that exceed the rate of economic growth—is again threatening to generate extreme discontent and undermine democratic values. Thomas Piketty’s findings in this ambitious, original, rigorous work will transform debate and set the agenda for the next generation of thought about wealth and inequality.
SKU: B074DVRW88 Category:

Description

Product details

  • ASIN

    :

    B074DVRW88
  • Publisher

    :

    Harvard University Press; Reprint edition (14 August 2017)
  • Language

    :

    English
  • File size

    :

    48115 KB
  • Text-to-Speech

    :

    Enabled
  • Enhanced typesetting

    :

    Enabled
  • X-Ray

    :

    Enabled
  • Word Wise

    :

    Enabled
  • Print length

    :

    817 pages

Additional information

ASIN ‏ : ‎

B074DVRW88

Publisher ‏ : ‎

Harvard University Press; Reprint edition (14 August 2017)

Language ‏ : ‎

English

File size ‏ : ‎

48115 KB

Text-to-Speech ‏ : ‎

Enabled

Enhanced typesetting ‏ : ‎

Enabled

X-Ray ‏ : ‎

Enabled

Word Wise ‏ : ‎

Enabled

Print length ‏ : ‎

817 pages

Best Sellers Rank:

#132 in Money & Monetary Policy

Customer Reviews:

3,427 ratings

10 thoughts on “Capital in the Twenty-First Century

  1. a book well written intending to caution the rulers all over the world and also it explains macro economicsfor the benifit of comon man with out academic background in economics.a must read book though muchof the discusion centres around usa and europe

  2. Capital is an AWESOME book. It’s like an academic textbook with PROFOUND wisdom. If you like Economics, read this book for:- The knowledge of Capital, Countries, GDP, Growth, Inflation, Capital Ratios, Global Economic Averages, “Rhenish Capitalism”, Savings, Wars, Wages, Salaries, Wealth & its distribution, Economists & Politics…- Delicious 1 liners! “Growth is the rising tide that lifts all boats” (Kuznets); “Capital is never quiet; it is risk-oriented & entrepreneurial”; “Too much Capital kills the return on Capital” (seen in overfunded startups)So, buy the book ONLY if you like Economics & its History (or to look clever by showing it on your Mantle).MUST OWN. “Should Read” (but hard to)

  3. Quity a handy book to understand the new age economoics and its implications. A must read recommended for economics students and professionals.

  4. It is amazing to see how beautifully Piketty has explained the working of inequality. It is the essence more than the objectivity which should affect the imagination of policy makers and people to lessen the notion that capitalism first create inequality and than equality( partially). We have to look for beeter solutions of sustainable development along with freedoms and capability entitlements of people.

  5. Great insights into the capital accumulation and inequality. The author has gone into the data from last three hundred years.

  6. I read somewhere that this book topped the list of publications that were sold in large numbers but most people could never go beyond the first 100 pages… That perception is wrong.. I found it a little difficult to start with … but prof. Piketty (and the translator) has done a wonderful job in keeping the whole subject interesting to read.. Major findings are often repeated in the book, emphasized upon and hence one never feels like putting it down after crossing the first 100 pages 🙂 …

  7. I found this book quite fascinating. The author is able to weave through history of income inequality and juxtapose it with current data gathered from US, UK, France, China and India. Quite a good read.However, the first 100, pages may be a bain to start. Keep at it and you will find the journey rewarding in the end.Let me iterate this is not a casual reading book … it is a serious study of the world’s inequality and being quite voluminous requires significant ability to concentrate and maintain focus …You also would need to have some understanding of basic economics to appreciate the work. Piketty, uses a lots of technical terms and rightly so perhaps, which refer to economics principles of demand and supply, r & g (rate of growth of capital vs growth of economy) at al, and lots of tables and charts. This is in that sense not a beginner’s book. It’s a book by an economist for economist. So don’t be ashamed to skip sections of the book which are above you pay grade. There are a lot of interesting case studies, which buttress the central theme “Inequality and how money makes more money”.His proposal for Global Tax on Capital (as he himself puts it) is quite “utopian” in its construct. However it’s a start, because the alternative of high tariffs and capital control is an unsatisfactory substitute.My only advice is to not read the book from cover to cover and pick chapters which interest you. The second half of the book is really interesting. There are some good case studies, like the Havard University’s $30 billion endowment and how they manage it, which are quite fascinating to read.So don’t miss those fascinating parts. To conclude I would say, Piketty has done a great job of harnessing data over several decades, curated, analysed and build a compelling case of ” rising capital inequality”, however, the proposed solution is quite ambitious and needs to be further fleshed out in context of global politics. Enjoy!

  8. Inquisitive read. Piketty explores the history of capital’s evolution in the last three centuries with absolute panache. Economic concepts were lucidly explained. Must read for anyone who likes to understand how capital was, is and might become in the future.

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